Next Meetings of our Cross-Media Research Group

AspergillusFumigatusOur Cross-Media Research Group continues to meet throughout the next semester and invites interested to researchers and students to participate.
We will meet on the following dates to explore the notion of The Scientific Image:

  • February 13, 3-5:30pm – Scientific Images (introduction by Flora Lysen)
  • April 17, 3-5:30pm – The Scientific Image in Art and History
  • June 5, 3-5:30pm – The Scientific Image in Film, TV, New Media

Departing from the “scientific image,” the three sessions of this semester will focus on the function of the image and its transformation as a resource in visualization, translation, control, manipulation and commodification. These functions, linked variably through history with knowledge production, expanded into fields as diverse as landscape painting, brain visualization, documentary film, and forensic television. Starting in the first session with a focus on the scientific image’s multiple functions (data visualization, diagrammatization, on-screen manipulation), the second and third sessions will look firstly at a genealogy of the conceptualization of the functions of the image across the fields mentioned above, while the final session will explore the crossmedial concretizations of these conceptualized functions including between film, television, photography, satellite imaging, etc.

In addition, we are happy to announce that we will hold a one-day workshop on June 12, 11am-7pm entitled Aesthetics and Politics of the Crossmedial Image.

See below for a description of this semesters research group and readings for the first meeting:

Departing from the “scientific image”, the three sessions of this semester will focus on the function of the image and its transformation as a resource in visualization, translation, control, manipulation and commodification. These functions, linked variably through history with knowledge production, expanded into fields as diverse as landscape painting, brain visualization, documentary film, and forensic television. Starting in the first session with a focus on the scientific image’s multiple functions (data visualization, diagrammatization, on-screen manipulation), the second and third sessions will look firstly at a genealogy of the conceptualization of the functions of the image across the fields mentioned above, while the final session will explore the crossmedial concretizations of these conceptualized functions including between film, television, photography, satellite imaging, etc.

The readings for the first meeting are all taken from the recent Coopmans, Catelijne et al., eds. Representation in Scientific Practice Revisited. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press, 2014. Please read:

  • “Introduction: Representation in Scientific Practice Revisited” (pgs. 1–12)
  • Annamaria Carusi and Aud Sissel Hoel, “Toward a New Ontology of Scientific Vision” (pgs. 201–21)
  • Joseph Dumit, “How (not) to Do Things with Brain Images” (pgs. 291–315)
  • Afterwords by Daston, Lynch, Woolgar, Latour (2-4 pages each)